Popover : A shirt story.

At times when you aim to dissect the history of a piece of clothing it’s like putting your hand into a clear pond and shaking it vigorously. The settled sediment goes everywhere and you just don’t know where to go from there. If you get that analogy then I applaud you, it made more sense in my head.
Saying that, the most common pulse you get when trying to get a some-what back story is from an American east-coast clothiers.gantpopoveresquire1960

1960s Gant, the American prep outfitters took the standard sport shirt and made some defining adjustments. Primarily ending the button placket early, which bought on the term popover (due to the nature of you having to pop-it-over your head to get it on). The shirt became a main stay of the Ivy leaguers of the day and defined a look from then onwards –  the piece working on a perfectly balanced line of smart yet casual. Allowing for the wearer to look dressed up, without dressing up. 

(1) IMG_2113

Vintage pattern research – Understanding the exact cut, shape and detaling.

A spring / summer essential and a piece that doesn’t spend too much time hanging on the rail of my wardrobe. To understand the cut and detailing of these classic, resilient shirts was imperative to me – as I had plans to create a take on them for the Scott Fraser Collection. After selecting the correct fabrics and trimmings I have put them into production, in London (England) where all the garments are made and are available now online.

(1) RedLS (1) RedLS2 (1) RedLS5 (1) RedLS3

http://scottfrasercollection.com/shop/red-chambray-popover-shirt/
(1) YellowLS-1(1) YellowLS2(1) YellowLS5(1) YellowLS3http://scottfrasercollection.com/shop/butter-yellow-popover-shirt/
(1) GreenLS(1) GreenLS2(1) GreenLS5(1) GreenLS3
http://scottfrasercollection.com/shop/mint-green-popover-shirt/

£90

Available in X-Small   –   X-Large

Made in London, England.

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This entry was published on May 25, 2014 at 11:39 am. It’s filed under Blog post and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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